Amateur footballer is left blind in his right eye after a parasite burrowed into his CORNEA when he had a shower with his contact lenses in

The amateur footballer is blind to the right eye after a parasite is buried in his CORNEA while he was showering with his contact lenses.

An amateur footballer remained partially blind because a parasite had sunk into his right eye after being showered with contact lenses.

Nick Humphreys, 29, of Shrewsbury, Shropshire, did not suspect it was dangerous to wear contact lenses in the shower and did so regularly.

In January 2018, he noticed a painful scratch in the eye, which he treated with eye drops while opticians were testing for an infection.

The results were positive for Acanthamoeba keratitis, an infection with a small organism in water that can enter the eyes through a small incision – often caused by contact lenses.

In March 2018, journalist and athlete Humphreys of the local newspaper suddenly lost his sight while driving his car and never recovered.

The 18-month ordeal had a huge impact on the mental health of Humphreys, who struggled to overcome the limitations of his damaged eye – which had to be eliminated almost completely.

He underwent two eye surgeries, one of which was supposed to eliminate the infection, and is now waiting for a corneal transplant.

Nick Humphreys, 29, has been left partially blind (pictured) because a parasite started living in his right eye after he showered with contact lenses in

Nick Humphreys, 29, has been left partially blind (pictured) because a parasite started living in his right eye after he showered with contact lenses in 

Mr. Humphreys said, “I made contact because I did not like the look with glasses and it almost cost me the right eye.

“If I had known how dangerous it was to have contact in the shower, I would never have had them.

“After being infected, I went to the gym every other day, played football three times a week, stayed at home for six months and lost my desire to live.”

According to charities, the number of people with visual impairments is increasing. It is more common in people who wear contact lenses.

Mr Humphreys, of Shrewsbury, Shropshire, had started using contact lenses to improve his appearance and so he didn't need to wear glasses playing football. Pictured before

Mr Humphreys, of Shrewsbury, Shropshire, had started using contact lenses to improve his appearance and so he didn’t need to wear glasses playing football. Pictured before

Poor contact lens hygiene, use of tap water to clean or store contact lenses, or contamination of lenses with tap water, pool, or hot tub increases the risk of contact lenses. ‘infection.

Mr. Humphreys was wearing short-term glasses since he was four years old. To improve his appearance and vision of the sport, Humphreys opted for monthly lenses that cost about 25 pounds each time.

He said: “In the mid-twenties, I really went there and at that time I thought my glasses were a huge obstacle.

“When I finally overcame my fear of contact, I thought it was the best thing.”

Mr Humphreys had no idea it was dangerous to wear contact lenses in the shower and would regularly do so. Pictured now wearing glasses

Mr Humphreys had no idea it was dangerous to wear contact lenses in the shower and would regularly do so. Pictured now wearing glasses 

Humphrey used his contacts for up to five days a week and wore glasses on other days.

He said, “On a normal morning, I woke up, put on my lenses and went to work at the gym, then jumped in the shower before going to the office.

“I did not think about it at the time, I was never told not to wear contact lenses in the shower, there is no warning on the packaging and my opticians have never spoken of a risk. ‘

Mr. Humphreys woke up one morning in January 2018 and could not see properly through his right eye.

He guessed he had scratched her with his lenses, but as the week went on, it became clear that something much worse had happened.

Mr Humphreys first noticed a scratch on his eye which opticians confirmed to be an ulcer. They took scratches from his eye to test for infection - which came back positive

Mr Humphreys first noticed a scratch on his eye which opticians confirmed to be an ulcer. They took scratches from his eye to test for infection – which came back positive 

He said, “For a few days, I used eye drops on the counter and lowered all the display settings on my phone and computer to the lowest brightness, which seemed to be the thing.”

When he decided to consult the optometrist, Mr. Humphreys learned that he had an ulcer in his eye and recommended that he immediately go to the Royal Shrewsbury Hospital.

There, after being seen by a handful of eye specialists, he received five scratches from his right eye to test it.

“The doctors said they could not be sure what was going on until they got the test results, but they thought it might be Acanthamoeba keratitis,” Humphreys said. .

“I had never heard of the infection, but when I got home, I turned to Dr. Google and suddenly thought my right eye would be removed.”

A week later, the doctors informed Humphreys that he had passed a positive test on the AK and feared that his football days would be over.

Contact lenses can cause small scratches in the eyes, which can make it easier for the body to get caught when the eyes come in contact with water.

Mr. Humphreys said, “I told the doctor that I had read horror stories and asked him if I needed to take my eye off.

He just looked at me and said, “This could be a possibility.”

“I realized it’s serious.”

Mr. Humphreys used disinfectant eye drops for three weeks and it was like he was healing. Until March 2018 he had become completely blind to the right eye.

“I went to work and my vision went completely in my right eye.”

“I do not know how I managed not to spill, but I soon realized that I had to go back to the hospital.”

Doctors referred to the Birmingham and Midland Eye Center prescribed more powerful eye drops that were to be applied every hour, even at night.

After weeks of sleepless nights and disability, Mr. Humphreys was handcuffed and depressed as the doctors tried to find the best course of action.

Mr Humphreys' sight has not returned since March 2018, when he suddenly lost his vision while driving. Pictured before the 18-month ordeal

Mr Humphreys’ sight has not returned since March 2018, when he suddenly lost his vision while driving. Pictured before the 18-month ordeal 

He said, “I love my job, but physically, I could not be outside the house.

“The pain in my eyes was too big and I was just going to the hospital.

“I felt at the bottom of the ladder and the only thing that would cheer me up – playing football – was no longer an option.”

Six months after his initial diagnosis, the doctors decided that the only remaining option was to perform a corneal mesh in July 2018.

The method involves the use of ultraviolet rays and drops of vitamin B2 to stiffen the cornea by attaching the fibers more closely to the cornea.

While the procedure eliminated the infection, Mr. Humphreys remained blind to the right eye.

He said, “Of course, I did not want to be blind in my right eye, but at least, knowing that the infection was gone, I could have a better life.” Finally, I could work again and go to work. gym. ‘

Mr. Humphreys still needed additional treatment. In September 2018, he underwent an amniotic membrane graft on the right cornea at the Birmingham and West Midland Eye Center.

The procedure involves grafting tissue from the amniotic membrane – the innermost layer of the placenta – over the eye to protect the cornea.

It has anti-inflammatory and anti-scarring effects and contains growth factors that promote the healing of wounds on the ocular surface.

Although the treatment was successful until Christmas 2018 after the second surgery, Mr. Humphreys’ attitude to life collapsed.

“The reality of the situation really hit me, I let myself go, because all this happened and I had a bloody eye that I had to cover with an eye patch – it was an ordinary exorcist.”

After being referred by the general practitioner to a counselor, Humphreys slowly accepted his problem.

He works with the charity Fight for Sight to raise awareness of the danger of contact lenses when showering or swimming.

He said, “I can honestly say that if I had any idea that it was even a distant possibility, I would have had no contact at all.

“It’s essential that people know that this is a reality and that it may be due to something as simple as taking a shower.”

Mr. Humphreys was removed from a corneal transplant for six weeks – an operation in which a damaged cornea is replaced by a healthy donor tissue by a deceased person.

He said: “I lost 18 months of my life because I had such easy contacts.

“If I can see again, I will never get in. Like Edgar Davids, a former Dutch professional footballer, I wear goggles to play sports.”

According to a study published last year by the Ophthalmology Clinic Moorfield’s Eye, the AK has tripled in the last eight years.

Fight For Sight said the results could be relevant throughout the UK because the hospital treats a large number of AK cases.

A YouGov survey on Fight for Sight found that many British contact lens wearers were putting their vision at risk because of precarious habits, as they did not know they could develop an infection such as AK.

Worryingly, 56% of those surveyed reported taking them longer than the recommended 12 hours a day, 54% said they swam or showered, and 47% said they slept.

To date, 15% of respondents have put them in their mouth to clean or lubricate, and 2% have even shared used lenses with other carriers.

Source: https://www.dailymail.co.uk